Tag Archives: casual walkers

Mount Cordeaux and Bare Rock – Main Range

After climbing the Mount Mitchell Peaks a couple of months ago, I decided to take my hiking group to another of the hikes in the same area.  I  set this up a couple of weeks before I went to Tonga and on my return discovered more than 50 people had registered.

I set the Aratula petrol station as our meeting place, about 10km from the beginning of the trail, making it easy for everyone to find.  While 50 is a lot for a hike, I expected a third to pull out, but a total of 45 showed up.  I discovered another group of 26 would also be on the trail also, so it was going to be busy.

Because of the lack of parking at Cunningham’s Gap, I suggested car pooling, so leaving some cars behind, we set off for the trailhead. The Mount Cordeaux and Bare Rock trail is 12.6km return or about 4 hours. It’s a Class 3 (well defined wide dirt track) with points of Class 4 (rocky defined path).

There are several trailheads leading off from the car park and I ensured we were heading along the right one before we headed off. The initial trail is a small circuit that connects all of the other trails together.  We walked along this on a wide dirt track to a lookout.

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We continued along the circuit trail until we found the turn off to Mount Cordeaux and headed along it. The track began climbing immediately. The track zig-zagged up the side of the mountain to a point where the vegetation cleared and the western peak of Mount Mitchell could be seen across the gap.

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About 4km into our climb and at the base of the great rocky face of Mount Cordeaux the trail forked.  We took the path to the right on a rocky path around the side of the mountain to a lookout, climbing stone steps to get there.

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The lookout is a fairly large flat rocky area with plenty of room for our numbers. We stopped for a break, enjoyed the view across the valley to Lake Moogerah and Mount Greville – the next group hike I intend to arrange.

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After 15 minutes, I led the group back to the fork and we continued along the trail around the other side of Mount Cordeaux on rocky steps.  We continued across a short saddle and into a throng of trees before the trail began to climb steeply.  The climb was fairly brief and we soon emerged onto Bare Rock, a large area similar to the lookout with views north along the Main Range.

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Being late winter, I had expected it to be a little blustery, but we’d been lucky up to this point. Once at the top, however, the wind picked up and it cooled down. The group stayed for about half an hour, eating lunch and talking until the wind got too much and we set off down again.

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The climb to Bare Rock was not particularly hard and with so many people, was slow going. The trip down was quicker, with most being a gentle meander heading back towards the car park.

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The hike turned out to be a success with everyone enjoying themselves. To celebrate, 20 of us headed to the Aratula hotel for a beer – a must following a hike – before heading home.

Next I’m back to my lone wanderings, the many short trails of Mount Tamborine.

The Trail Wanderer.

Burleigh Head National Park

It’s my first weekend back after my Kingdom of Tonga trip and the weather is beautiful, so I decided to get out and do a mild walk. Today I chose Burleigh Head National Park.

Burleigh Head National Park map

Map is owned by and used with courtesy of Queensland Government.  Please visit that site for more detailed information on hiking in this region.

The Burleigh Heads are a section of beach at the southern end of Queensland’s Gold Coast.  The national park is nestled alongside the creek.

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From the Gold Coast Highway, I walked along the trail at the side of the Tallebudgera Creek with people fishing on my side and sun baking on the other.

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The ‘trail’ is more of a sealed path and is suitable for wheelchair access, which makes it a class 2 track.

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The path either continues around the base of the national park or cuts into it. I cut in and began climbing a fairly steep hill. While much of the national park is rainforest, I liked the great rocky outcrops and boulders alongside the path. After a fair climb up the steepish path, I arrived at Tumgun Lookout and peered out along the coast to the south.

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The climb down from the lookout heads down to the beach and contains several sets of short stairs until it emerges at the end of Burleigh Heads Beach and a view along the Gold Coast.

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I headed back up along the path to a junction and headed around the back of the national park, which is not as picturesque as the other way.

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Arriving back at the creek, I followed the lower walk around the base of the national park for another, lower, view of the beach before heading back to the car and home.

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I was only looking for a short walk today and even though the drive to and from this national park combined was longer than the time I spent there, it was still worth the effort and the sweat.

Next week, a real track.

The Trail Wanderer.

Mount Mitchell Peaks – Main Range

The Main Range National Park is a section of South East Queensland’s Scenic Rim – a quarter circle of mountains attributed to the prehistoric Tweed volcano that existed here over 23 million years ago. The Main Range is about 115km inland from Brisbane and has plentiful walking tracks along its length.

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This last weekend, while passing through the Main Range, I had a free morning so stopped at Cunningham’s Gap – the location where Cunningham Highway cuts through the mountains. Cunningham’s Gap is the starting point of several well-defined and more casual walks.

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The Major Mitchell Peaks is a 10.2km, 3.5 hour walk, perfect for the time I had. The beginning of the trail starts opposite the car park and meanders its way up the side of the mountain along a forest path.

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The closeness of the forest gives the illusion that the trail is fairly flat, but it’s not.  It’s only the last few hundred metres that the trail begins to climb more steeply, with steps cut into the rock.

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The views to the east are fantastic with the road winding through the forest.  Lake Moogera can be seen between Mt Greville on the right and Mt Edwards.

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To the north, Mt Cordeaux.

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The trail heads back into the forest as it rounds the Western peak and emerges at the top of the Eastern peak, a short pinnacle of rock that’s been paved to prevent further erosion. I basked in the winter sunshine eating lunch with views in both directions.

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I would have stayed longer but the occasional icy gust quickly chilled me. The return walk passed quickly and the tranquillity of the trail was broken by the harsh sounds of trucks going past on the Cunningham Highway.  On reaching the highway, I returned to my car and continued on my trip.

The Lone Trail Wanderer

D’aguilar National Park

16 June 2012

Rainforest Circuit, Cypress Grove and Greenes Falls.

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Maps on this page are owned by and used with courtesy of Queensland Government.  Please visit that site for more detailed information on hiking in this region.

While I much prefer harder and rockier walks, there were several walks in the D’aguilar National Park that I had on my list to do. D’aguilar National Park is mainly forest, so it’s trees, trees, trees, and the tracks are well-defined and not terribly difficult.

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To cross them off my list, I headed out with a friend to the Mt Glorious section and walked into the rainforest. It was an entertaining walk in the cool morning air, with large strangler figs in many places.

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The Rainforest Circuit and Cypress Groves were fairly standard fare. Greenes Falls was a great place for a sit down and a chat.

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The falls are fenced off, but this didn’t stop me from climbing the fence and rock hopping down to the edge of the falls.

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Western Window Track

Across the road from the Cypress Grove walks is another tree laden walk along the side of a steeply sloping cliff.

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Morelia Walking Track and Atrax Circuit

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Another slow meander through the forest, climbing fallen giant eucalypts and walking through great burnt out trunks.

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The trail eventually led to the Mount Nebo lookout, and while there is only a limited viewing area, Moreton Bay is visible in the distance.

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Overall, the trails in the D’aguilar National Park aren’t very taxing, but if you enjoy walking in the woods, this is a good place to spend a few hours on a warm sunday afternoon.

The Lone Trail Wanderer

Mooloorah River NP, Dularcha NP, Tibrogargan Circuit

Today was my third day walking in Glass House Mountains.  On Day One I climbed Mt Ngungun and Mt Beerburrum, while on Day Two I climbed Mt Tibrogargan and Wild Horse Mountain. Today I won’t be climbing any of the mountains, instead walking several of the other short walks in and around the Glass House Mountains.

Mooloolah River National Park, Jowarra Section 1.5km

Mooloolah River National Park maps

Map is owned by and used with courtesy of Queensland Government.  Please visit that site for more detailed information on hiking in this region.

There are two short tracks in the tiny Jowarra Section of the Mooloolah River National Park and together they are only 1.5km long.  They are both only class 2 with concrete tracks and no climbing at all.  It was a cool morning when we arrived and much of the beauty was in the mists that hung about trees.  The two simple loops took little time to walk and before we knew it we were back in the car and off to Dularcha National Park.

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Dularcha National Park – 4km

The main draw card for the Dularcha National Park is an old railway tunnel about half way along the trail.

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The trail is wide and easy to follow as it runs alongside the new railway tracks.  Horses and cyclists regularly ride along the trail and while here we saw two different families on their bikes.  This class 3 trail rose and fell slightly as we walked but remained fairly flat.  While not a difficult walk I did break a sweat but more from the direct sunlight than how strenuous the trail was.

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The train tunnel was pretty cool, although was only fairly short.  There are reportedly micro bats living in this tunnel which I was keen to see, but we didn’t find any.

Dularcha National Park map

Map is owned by and used with courtesy of Queensland Government.  Please visit that site for more detailed information on hiking in this region.

The track is linear and after 2km you’re required to walk back along the same trail to the beginning.  On reaching the car, my companion waved the white flag, so I dropped him home and set off alone to do the last couple of more difficult tracks.

Tibrogargan Circuit and Trachyte Circuit – 7.3km

I climbed Mt Tibrogargan on a previous foray into the Glass House Mountains, but around the base of the mountain are a pair of tracks that when joined together are over 7km long.

Glass House Mountains walking track information and maps

Map is owned by and used with courtesy of Queensland Government.  Please visit that site for more detailed information on hiking in this region.

The Tibrogargan circuit (‘a’ on the above map) leads around the mountain to a T-junction where one branch heads back to the car park, the other is where  Trachyte Circuit (‘b’ on the above map) begins, cutting across the valley towards Mt Tibberoowuccum to a lookout before returning to the car park.  The trails are class 3 and class 4 respectively with a short climb to the lookout on the Trachyte Circuit.

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The views from the trail consist mainly of trees with the occasional creek crossing.  I stopped in several places to peer through the trees at one of the neighbouring mountains, but most did not give clear enough views to take photos.

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The most difficult part of the walk was the 100m section up to a Tibrogargan Circuit, where I chatted to some English tourists about New Zealand.

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The remainder of the track was fairly gentle and after a total of about an hour and a quarter I returned to the car park.

It was a good day of walks on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast and while I hadn’t planned any further walks in the Glass House Mountains National Park, my hiking group had other ideas. In a month they plan to climb the Tunbubudla Twins, a pair of small peaks at the southern end of the National Park.

Next I head to The Cougals for something more difficult hard to dig my teeth – or feet – into.

The Lone Trail Wanderer.

D’Aguilar National Park – Mt Coot-tha section

Mt Coot-tha is the tallest ‘mountain’ in Brisbane and is popular with tourists as its top lookout gives great views of the city and surrounding land.

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Map is owned by and used with courtesy of Brisbane City Council.  Please visit that site for more detailed information on walking in this region.

I’ve been to the lookout numerous times and have walked the lookout trail a couple of times also. On the northern slopes of Mt Coot-tha there are several less popular and less scenic walks I decided to explore.

Powerful Owl Track – 2.8km

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Powerful Owl Trail is a short track that climbs the north side of Mt Coot-tha.  Initially I was expecting a fairly straightforward walk in the woods, but shortly after beginning I got quite a surprise.  Not far after the beginning the trail turns quickly upwards  and climbs fairly steeply.  It certainly gets your muscles working and my calves felt it when I arrived at the top of the ridge.

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At the top of the ridge I followed the trail around to the left, through the forest until it began to descend down mud and roots steps.  After the steady downhill it didn’t take me long to emerge at a grassy reserve just around from the car park.

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Overall a good short walk although beyond the trees, not much to look at.

Simpson Falls and Eugenia Circuit – 4.1km

Beyond the Lookout Walk, the Simpson Falls circuit is one of the more popular on Mt Coot-tha.  It’s for this reason the trail leading to the falls is well presented and designed for casual walkers.  The trail climbs in switchbacks up the north-east side of the Mt Coot-tha with plentiful steps.

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Simpson Falls is a quaint little rocky area that during a wetter season would likely be more than just a trickle with small rock pools at the top and bottom of the rocky outcrop.  This was to be expected as it had been plentifully dry around the time I walked here.

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The Eugenia Circuit continues another 2.8km up the mountain from the Simpson Falls.  The path turns rockier and is less walked, crossing the stream twice on stepping-stones.  At a couple of points on the track I could make out suburbia over the trees, but no grand views.

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There was one other track I did not make it to – the Kokoda Trail, named after one of the men who walked the actual Kokoda trail.

The Lone Trail Wanderer.