Tag Archives: scotland

Arran Coastal Way, Scotland – Part 3

In late June 2019, I undertook a 6-day coastal hike around the Isle of Arran, my namesake island. This 65 mile / 105 km hike is a circuit of the island starting from the northernmost village and heading inland on several occasions. The weather was scheduled to be amazing with little rain.

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Back to Part 2

Day 5 – Brodick to Corrie – 7 mi / 11.5 km

While today is the shortest day distance-wise, I will be climbing Goatfell with my pack, so it will be one of the more difficult days of the walk. Although as it is just under 900 metres, it should not take too much of the day. After my first full Scottish breakfast for this trip, I set out from the bunkhouse and through Brodick. As I walked, more people came out and began the long slow walk to the Fell.

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The path led around the beach with some sand walking as I went. The Brodick castle standing prominent in the trees off to one side.

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The trail around the bay and up into the trees with a mix of short steep areas and slow gliding climbs. With my march on, I passed several slower climbers. While the trees offered respite from the sun, it also stopped the breeze, so the sweat came heavy. When I finally broke out of the tree line, the cool breeze in itself was worth the climb. I looked back for a view of Brodick.

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As people took breaks, I climbed on as the trail grew rockier and steeper. I crossed a wooden bridge and through a deer gate. I pushed on up the mountain, stopping for the occasional 10-second break before pushing on again. 10 seconds is enough to get the breath back before continuing on. I finally took a longer break where the trail reached a ridge that offered great views back the way I’d come, into the valley beyond and up the final 250 metres to the summit.

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After 10 min I pushed on up the very steep trail with more 10 second breaks, one every 20m until I reached the summit in the glorious sunshine. The views in every direction were amazing and all who had reached the top relaxed and enjoyed the sun.

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After about 30 minutes, I packed up and began the climb down. It didn’t take long to get to the junction, and I continued down the Corrie route. The way down was rockier, but I continued my charge down onto the plateau and across a stream.

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At the edge of the valley, it descended again on rocky steps eventually to a forest…

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…along a dirt track…

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…to a road and down steeply to the main road. I found the first seat I could,  got off my feet and out of my boots. After 10 minutes I headed a further few minutes to the local pub for a cider or three in the sun. I then headed on to Sannox where I would be staying the night, or so I thought. The hotel there was closed, and there were no other food options. I decided to walk the 2km back to Corrie for another cider and to wait for the hotel’s kitchen to open for dinner. After dinner, I headed along to the town hall and pitched my tent, where I had seen a bunch of people doing days earlier. It turns out I couldn’t camp there, so I headed back towards Sannox to a large boulder beside the road where I pitched a wild camp.

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Day 6 – Corrie to Lochranza – 10 mi / 16.5 km

After my night of wild camping, I packed up and headed back to Corrie for breakfast. Today was the shortest day with little to see, but it is expected to be the hottest day of the year also. This is Scotland, so we’re talking 24ºC. I headed out of Corrie and back along the road to Sannox, past the site of my wild camp and on to the beach. I then walked at the top of the beach, along a trail of sand and then dry earth.

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I walked on as the heat increased along with the wind, through a wooded area until I came to the Sannox Burn flowing out to sea. I didn’t see the point of walking a 400m inland and a 300m back when I could just cross on stepping stones. On the other side, I followed a sandy trail past some cliffs.

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On the other side, I followed two women for more than 2km along a rocky trail until it reached a place called quite descriptively “fallen rocks”. Giant rocks had fallen from the ridge a few years back.

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I passed the girls as the trail became more defined, and for the next 3 km, I followed it until it came to Laggan cottage where I popped inside to have a brief look around.

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The trail became more rocky and rugged for much of the rest of the trail except for a 500m stretch of beach called Fairy Dell. It passed a rock formation known as the Cock of Arran. It, apparently, once looked like a male chicken until its head fell off a year or two ago. Now it’s just a rock.

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After a short time, I came around the coast, and Lochranza appeared. Then it was only 30 minutes across the tarmac road around the bay to the ruins of the Lochranza Castle and then on to the Sandwich Shack where I began the walk.

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Overall

The Arran Coastal Way was a great six-day walk. Each day had its special elements all different from previous days. It worked out well for the weather, which likely added to the enjoyment.

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I would definitely recommend this walk, while fairly easy, is still enjoyable.

The Lone Trail Wanderer.

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Arran Coastal Way, Scotland – Part 2

In late June 2019, I undertook a 6-day coastal hike around the Isle of Arran, my namesake island. This 65 miles/ 105 km hike is a circuit of the island starting from the northernmost village and heading inland on several occasions. The weather was scheduled to be amazing with little rain.

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Back to Part 1

Day 3 – Pien via Blackwaterfoot to Kildonan – 14.5 mi / 23.5 km

I set out from my campsite and walked the 3.5 km back to Blackwaterfoot, where I stopped for a coffee and a breakfast cheeseburger with haggis. When in Scotland… I headed out along the beach on a mixed track of pebble beach dirt running through long grass. Scotland is tick central, so I made sure to stop every few minutes to check my legs. I still walk on shorts, it’s too hot otherwise, so it’s best to monitor my legs. Nettle sting goes away, so I tend to ignore it, but I’m vigilant with checking for ticks.

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For the next 8 km, I followed the trail around with more of the same. The weather, while supposedly cloudy all day became more sunny and warm along with a nice breeze.

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The trail then split, the easy route heading up to the road while the alternative continued along a more difficult beach track. I, of course, took the more difficult route as it hasn’t really been that strenuous so far. The trail was harder, to find that is, and I found myself crossing a farm and chatting to some quite vocal cows on the way.

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After a while, I came to a driveway that led me up off the beach to the main road. I followed this road for 4 km to Lagg, where I stopped at the cafe for lunch, a coffee, then next door to the hotel for a cider. Then on down to the beach past a 5000-year-old burial mound.

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My next target was Bennan Head, which I had to pass before high tide else I would be stuck. I had monitored the tide times and had aimed to get there with at least an hour to spare. As I came along the beach, it turned into rock hopping, with the seas slowly closing in.

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On the way, Pladda Isle appeared with its lighthouse as did the more distant Ailsa Craig, a volcanic plug poking out from the ocean.

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It was almost two kilometres of rock hopping, but about midway, I came to Bennan Head and Black cave, the largest cave on Arran. With time running out, I decided to climb up the back of the cave to see where it went. Out through the gap and around to a viewpoint. I didn’t stay long, climbing down again and getting on with the walk.

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I rock hopped around the head to the beach before working my way along the beach to Kildonan, my stop for the night where I enjoyed a sunny view from a pub out past the lighthouse to the volcanic island. And, of course, a cider.

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Day 4 – Kildonan to Brodick – 16.5 mi / 27.5 km

Today will be the longest day if the hike. The day started cloudy, and the wind from the night before was still there. This kept the morning cool and more importantly, the midges away. I packed up and headed out of the caravan park along the beach. My first goal today was to get around Dippin head. As I walked, I passed the Kildonan Castle, although it was technically only a watchtower.

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Thankfully the tide was on the way out, but with the boulder field twice as long as Bennan Head yesterday, I soon got fed up with rock hopping. Finally, I came out the other side onto a thistle packed, nettle studded tall grassy trail and headed along the beach to Largybeg.

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Not long after I arrived at Whiting Bay and found a cafe for coffee and brunch. I ran into two ladies who had camped near me overnight and chatted to them about my next leg as they’d come a different way. The view on the way into Whiting Bay with the Holy Island at the end (the mountains to the right).

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I then headed out up into the hills on a steep set of roads that turned into a dirt trail through the woods. I followed this through a section of felled trees to Glenashdale Falls and around to a viewing platform.

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The sky cleared almost completely and stayed that way for the rest of the day. I followed the road first up to a high point with amazing views.

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The road continued on for another 4 km, but I enjoyed the few times when trees offered shade, and I got some respite from the sun. I eventually arrived at the bottom of the road and decided to push on into Lamlash for a cider and a break from the heat. I found a bar and sat out the front with my drink looking out to Holy Island in the bay.

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After the drink, I headed on to Clauchlands Point, 2.5 km from Lamlash and the easternmost tip of the island.

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I rounded the point to be presented with 2 options, the standard trail along the coast all the way to Brodick or the alternative ‘high’ route. Of course, I took the high route. At the top of the first climb, I saw the trail meandered up over the cliff tops working its way higher and higher. This, of course, gave amazing views in all directions.

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I eventually headed downhill come out at a road the would lead me down into Brodick. It would have been another three km to the wild camping spot, and after my long walk and climbs in the sun, I found a bunkhouse and booked. My first bed in 4 days.

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Next days 5 and 6 of the Arran Coastal Way.

The Lone Trail Wanderer

Arran Coastal Way, Scotland – Part 1

In late June 2019, I undertook a 6-day coastal hike around the Isle of Arran, my namesake island. This 65 mile / 105 km hike is a circuit of the island starting from the northernmost village and heading inland on several occasions. The weather was scheduled to be amazing with little rain.

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Day 1 – Lochranza to Imachar – 11 mi / 18.2 km

The first day of the walk is not scheduled to be a long one, but there is s sidewalk added for a bit of variety. Lochranza is the northernmost village on the island and even has a ruined castle on the bay.

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I walked out of the hostel and along to the Sandwich Shack for breakfast and a coffee. Then I headed up the hill on a steep farmers driveway past the ruins of the island’s oldest house.

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While I was only 60 metres or so above sea level, the views were still enjoyable out across to the Mull of Kintyre, reminding me of the old song of the same name.

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I rounded the hill with the trail descending a little before it ran behind the long row of houses at Catacol. I climbed down to the road and onto the pebble beach where I picked my way along for the next 4.5km.

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About two-thirds of the way through the day is the side trail, which climbs up the hill to Coire Fhionn Lochan, a small lake nestled in the bowl beneath small peaks. The climb was pretty straightforward to 340m, and I passed several families on my way up. When I got to the small lake, I dropped my pack for a rest and chatted to some other climbers.

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The wind was blustery but not cold. I was told the lake can be a mirror but for the wind, a shame but a good view anyway. After my break, I climbed back down, passing a family that had still not made it to the top. The view back the other way was wonderful.

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When I got back to the road, I continued on along the beach. I arrived at Pirnmill with enough time for a light lunch at the restaurant before they closed until dinner. I hung out in the sunshine and topped up supplies at the shop next door before setting off again along the beach.

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For the next 3.5 km, I picked my way along the beach until I eventually arrived at where my map said was Imacher. But instead of what I thought might be a village, was absolutely nothing. The road went up over the hill, so I took a walk up it and found a small handful of houses, most of them abandoned and overgrown. But when I rounded the corner on one abandoned house, I ran into this male peacock showing his stuff.

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There was an ostentation of peacocks, with several males (peafowl), 3 females and some chicks
. After the show, I headed down to a wild camping spot I’d walked past, pitched my tent and settled in for the rest of the day.

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Day 2 – Inachar to Pien via Blackwaterfoot – 11 mi / 18 km

It had rained overnight but and I had no wild visitors overnight. I had a breakfast of oat biscuits before breaking camp. The sky was dark, and the wind gusty as I set out onto the road.

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Today, walking along the beach was not such an option. It would have been possible but I was racing to avoid the forecasted rain, so I took the quicker alternative along the road. Today is the only day forecast for rain, let’s hope the sun stays for the rest of the week. My first port of call is Cafe Thyme 5km along from my wild camp. The walk was fairly straightforward, and along the way, I even spied seals chilling on some rocks.

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When I arrived at the cafe, they were just opening. They did not serve breakfast, but the waitress organised some scrambled eggs for me anyway. We chatted about life in general and getting out of London, which she had done 10 months earlier. After coffee, I set off and noted a standing stone in a paddock. So, I crossed to get a better look.

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Two kilometres on and I came past Dunedin (the name of a house) to the Machrie Bay Golf Club tea rooms where I bought some water. Then another kilometre further on to car park for the Machrie Moors Standing Stones. I walked the mile to the moors and the several groups of standing stones there…

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…not to mention rock
circles.

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Then, as I made my way back to the road, it began to rain. A mile further along and I came to the Torr Righ Beag, a small wooded National Park. I walked around the outskirts looking back along the coast to where I had started the day (at the furthermost edge of the coast).

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I continued around the path to the coast and before heading down a steep trail to the beach. I walked past the King’s cave, which is caged off, and a pair of natural arches.

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I then set my sights on the Doon Fort, a rock formation where an iron aged fort had once stood.

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I walked around the back and up to the top, getting great views across the bay. After a look around I climbed down the Tor to a golf club where I walked to the beach and along to Blackwaterfoot. I found a bar to wait for the restaurant to open, allowing me to have cider and get my feet out of my sodden boots.

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After dinner a walked the 3 km along roads to the campground where I would encounter plentiful midges but a hot shower!

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Next, days 3 and 4 of the Arran Coastal Way.

The Lone Trail Wanderer